rory

31 Dec 2011 4,173 views
 
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                                                BELOVED TOMATO - THE SCANDALOUS FRUIT - Finale

                                                

Americans and Northern Europeans remained skeptical of the strange fruit and it took until the late 1700's - early 1800's for the fruit to gain popularity in both England and America.  In 1820 in New Jersey, Robert Johnson announced he would disprove all fears and publicly eat tomatoes.  He survived to the astonishment of the crowd, of whom several ladies had fainted.  (Perhaps it was the ruby red spurting juice and seeds?)  Could he have set up the first tomato canning factory?  No one knows.

 

 

In 1883, the Congress of America levied a 10% tax on all imported vegetables and decided to reclassify the tomato as a vegetable.  Contested in 1893 by a botanist who lost his case, arguing that it is in reality a berry fruit.  Since then the tomato has been legally classified a vegetable.

 

 

Considering that the tomato has been enjoyed since pre-Columbian times (+ - 900 BC) in Mesoamerica, it has taken only a few hundred years for the tomato to become accepted worldwide since that  first early encounter with it by the Spanish conquistadors in the 15th century.

 

 

From South America to southern Europe, then further north to England, then back to the Americas in the USA, it continued to spread throughout Northern Africa.  It reached still further eastwards to Turkey, Iran, India, Asia and beyond to space when in 2000* the Chinese developed a new breed of tomato from tomato seeds sent up in a satellite.

 

 

So, what  would be so scandalous about tomatoes today?

 

 

If we didn't have any.

Enjoy

                                                BELOVED TOMATO - THE SCANDALOUS FRUIT - Finale

                                                

Americans and Northern Europeans remained skeptical of the strange fruit and it took until the late 1700's - early 1800's for the fruit to gain popularity in both England and America.  In 1820 in New Jersey, Robert Johnson announced he would disprove all fears and publicly eat tomatoes.  He survived to the astonishment of the crowd, of whom several ladies had fainted.  (Perhaps it was the ruby red spurting juice and seeds?)  Could he have set up the first tomato canning factory?  No one knows.

 

 

In 1883, the Congress of America levied a 10% tax on all imported vegetables and decided to reclassify the tomato as a vegetable.  Contested in 1893 by a botanist who lost his case, arguing that it is in reality a berry fruit.  Since then the tomato has been legally classified a vegetable.

 

 

Considering that the tomato has been enjoyed since pre-Columbian times (+ - 900 BC) in Mesoamerica, it has taken only a few hundred years for the tomato to become accepted worldwide since that  first early encounter with it by the Spanish conquistadors in the 15th century.

 

 

From South America to southern Europe, then further north to England, then back to the Americas in the USA, it continued to spread throughout Northern Africa.  It reached still further eastwards to Turkey, Iran, India, Asia and beyond to space when in 2000* the Chinese developed a new breed of tomato from tomato seeds sent up in a satellite.

 

 

So, what  would be so scandalous about tomatoes today?

 

 

If we didn't have any.

comments (7)

Knowledge is knowing the tomato is a fruit

Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.

Happy New Year Rorysmile
Rory Ingle: he he ... love that, Happy New Year Bill
Vibrant collage Rory... Happy New Year 2012
Rory Ingle: and same to you Jacquelyn, 2012 is going to be a good year.
Mmmm yummy - making me hungry! Great education you've brought us! The only thing scandalous is people thinking they should have tomatoes in the middle of winter - so that the things you get at the grocery are completely tasteless!
Rory Ingle: Yeah those that they keep on ice, terrible.
Great collage Rory.
My best wishes for the New Year to you and yours!
Rory Ingle: Thanks Richard, and all the best for the new year too.
  • Linda
  • United Kingdom
  • 1 Jan 2012, 13:18
Happy New Year Rory smile
Rory Ingle: To you too Linda, all the best.
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 2 Jan 2012, 07:25
An interesting little series and the red globes make such great pictures.

The american court case was quite interesting. The didn't deny that tomatoes, zucchini, peas, etc are all fruit of the various plants. The decision taken by the court was a mix between culinary use and linguistic application.

The main argument that the court based their finding on; was where in the normal multi-course meal will you find the tomato. As a vegetable with the main course or a sweet with the desserts. The argument was then that common folk has long since classified the tomato as a veggie (via application) and the court supported that classification/ruling.

I like Bill's comment. It somehow bears out what the court ruled.
Rory Ingle: Thanks Louis for the that, I must agree with the court and Bill.
  • Debb
  • United Kingdom
  • 5 Mar 2012, 16:16
Great photos. I love tomatoes, always have. And I've often considered photographing them, but you beat me to it.
And thanks for the lesson.

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