rory

29 Dec 2011 215 views
 
supporter of
atom rss 1.0 rss 2.0
web browser google del.icio.us digg technorati
| lost password
birth date
cancel
photoblog image Devil's Fruit

Devil's Fruit

BELOVED TOMATO - THE SCANDALOUS FRUIT

 

It's seductive harlot red colour, the sensuous, slightly sweet flesh bursting with juicy splendour - proved far too much for the Church Fathers who called it scandalous.  Some even thought that this and not the apple was the fruit that Eve offered her Adam.  And, like that famous pair, was cast out of Eden but to the farthest stretches of the earth far, far away from the first prototypes of humanity.  

 

Still others suggested that since this was such a tempting, obviously forbidden fruit that the lost Eden could only be in South America.  Yes, it upset the Church of Rome to its foundations.  More unsettling to the patriarchal church, was that it was deemed the very symbol of woman - tempting, bewitching, and a threat to male dominance.  Worse yet, the plant is hermaphrodite, or is a perfect plant containing all it needs to self pollinate.   The cautious fervent avoided the tomato for almost 150 years but it  began to emerge in old culinary texts as a garnish or decorative puree by mostly the Spanish and Italians. 

Devil's Fruit

BELOVED TOMATO - THE SCANDALOUS FRUIT

 

It's seductive harlot red colour, the sensuous, slightly sweet flesh bursting with juicy splendour - proved far too much for the Church Fathers who called it scandalous.  Some even thought that this and not the apple was the fruit that Eve offered her Adam.  And, like that famous pair, was cast out of Eden but to the farthest stretches of the earth far, far away from the first prototypes of humanity.  

 

Still others suggested that since this was such a tempting, obviously forbidden fruit that the lost Eden could only be in South America.  Yes, it upset the Church of Rome to its foundations.  More unsettling to the patriarchal church, was that it was deemed the very symbol of woman - tempting, bewitching, and a threat to male dominance.  Worse yet, the plant is hermaphrodite, or is a perfect plant containing all it needs to self pollinate.   The cautious fervent avoided the tomato for almost 150 years but it  began to emerge in old culinary texts as a garnish or decorative puree by mostly the Spanish and Italians. 

comments (6)

A great shot here Rory, and I love the narrative.
Rory Ingle: Thanks Frances, I decided to carry on this theme.
A beautiful shot of my favorite fruit! Interesting history Rory!
Rory Ingle: Mine too, it's amazing how long it took the tomato to be accepted.
Great bit of History. I like a nice tomato
Rory Ingle: Me too, smile more tomorrow Bill.
Thanks for the interesting narrative Rory.
I nlike the tones!
Rory Ingle: Thanks Richard, I can't help following the story
Ohhhh... very interesting narrative. Yummy photo.
I grew up in the southern most town titled... the Tomato Capital of Canada. There's even a tomato shaped tourist stand downtown. Most summers driving meant trying to get around huge tomato wagons going into town to take their tomatoes to the H. J. Heinz company for processing. One summer a humungous storage vat blew up that shook our house and tomato puree flew everywhere into even the parked car windows. Hahaha... a funny memory.
Rory Ingle: he he yes especially home grown, love your story Jacquelyn.
  • eva
  • United Kingdom
  • 5 Jan 2012, 07:23
Of course the sapnish knew straightaway what the world was missing ;-)
Rory Ingle: smile, that's what I like about the Spanish smile

Leave a comment

must fill in
[stop comment form]
show
for this photo I'm in a any and all comments icon ShMood©
camera Canon PowerShot S95
exposure mode full manual
shutterspeed 1/125s
aperture f/4.0
sensitivity ISO250
focal length 6.0mm
EnjoyEnjoy
Dark and MysteriousDark and Mysteri...
step out this Christmasstep out this Ch...

Warning